How to Draw a Tulip – Really Easy Drawing Tutorial

Tulips are a lily-like flower native to Europe and northern Africa. They began to be cultivated as a garden plant as early as the 10th century in Persia. The flowers are still a favorite in backyards and as cut flowers around the world. For centuries, giving a tulip has been seen as a symbol of love and affection, the dark center of the flower representing a heart scorched by the flames of passion.

Seventy-five wild species of tulips have been identified, and there are thousands of different varieties available for your garden. Each year, contests are held at tulip festivals to determine the prettiest new tulip colors and patterns that have been bred by cultivators. Many commercially available tulips are grown in Holland, where tulip farms produce sprawling fields of brightly colored plants in spring, with row after row of rainbow hued petals swaying gently in the breeze. At one time, these plants were so valuable in Holland that tulip bulbs could be used instead of money.

Tulips have long held a prominent place in art. The work of thirteenth century Persian poet Musharifu’d-din Saadi holds one of the earliest mentions of the flower. From the 1600’s onward, tulips often appeared in European still life paintings. Today, the tulip is depicted on several coins used in Iran, and Turkish Airlines embellishes its aircraft with the image of a tulip. In Turkey, the tulip is considered a symbol of paradise.

Would you like to draw your very own tulip? Doing so is easy with the help of this simple, step-by-step drawing tutorial. All you will need is a pencil, a piece of paper, and perhaps an eraser. You will likely wish to use bright crayons, markers, colored pencils, or paints to complete your drawing.

Notice that each step of this drawing guide includes explanatory text as well as an illustration. In each picture, new lines added are highlighted in blue. Once you’ve mastered this tutorial, don’t stop with just one tulip – try your hand at drawing an entire garden of these lovely flowers.

If you liked this tutorial, see also the following drawing guides: Sunflower, Lily, and Rose with Stem.

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Step-by-Step Instructions for Drawing a Tulip

How to Draw Tulip

1. Begin by drawing two long, curved, parallel lines. This will form the tulip’s stem.

2. Draw a long, “U” shaped curved line at the top of the stem. This outlines the tulip’s flower.

3. Draw a curved line across the flower, enclosing a teardrop shape. This outlines one of the flower’s petals.

4. Draw a second curved line across the flower, enclosing another partial teardrop shape. This forms another flower petal.

5. Draw a curved line like an upside down “U” on top of the flower. This encloses yet another petal.

6. Extend two long, curved lines from one side of the flower’s stem, allowing the lines to meet in a sharp point. This outlines one of the flower’s leaves.

7. Extend another set of long, curved lines from the flower’s stem. Again, allow the lines to meet in a sharp point, forming the second leaf.

8. At the top of the flower, draw a short, curved line between each of the petals. These lines indicate additional petals within the flower.

9. Add detail to your tulip. Draw short, curved lines of varying lengths along the leaves and petals of the flower. This gives the tulip a sense of texture and depth.

10. Color your beautiful tulip. While often shaded in pink or red, tulips come in all colors and many color combinations, including stripes, patterns that resemble paint spatters, and differently colored petal edges. Tulips may be white, green, orange, purple, or even black, and every color in between.

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  • This is a wonderful gift u have chosen to share and I wanted to tell u Thank u from the bottom of my heart! These tutorials r just what I needed.

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