How to Draw Dragons: 50 Best Dragon Drawing Tutorials

How many dragons can you name? Toothless, Stormfly, Hookfang, Meatlug, Barf and Belch. Charizard, Dragonite. Mushu. Elliot. Faranth, Ramoth, Canth. Spike. Spyro. Puff. These are just a few of the dragons who have made appearances in popular culture.

For millennia, dragons have featured in the art and mythologies of cultures from around the world.


The word "dragon" is derived from the ancient Greek word drákōn, meaning "a serpent of huge size; a water snake."

Dragons and dragon-like animals are mentioned in such ancient manuscripts as the Bible and the Epic of Gilgamesh. Maps from the Middle Ages were often marked with the warning "here be dragons" or depictions of sea serpents in areas that had yet to be explored.



Easy, step-by-step drawing tutorials are available for any style of dragon - cartoon, European, Chinese, or otherwise - that you may wish to draw.

Below, we have compiled some of the best dragon drawing guides from across the web.

You will also find how-to guides for drawing dragon parts - such as the head, wings, legs, or talons - so that you can craft your very own dragon.

If you have a pencil and a piece of paper, you have everything you need to begin your own draconian adventure.

50 Best Dragon Drawing Ideas

European Dragons

Dragon mythologies evolved separately in Europe and in Asia. European dragons are often depicted as being dinosaur-like or griffin-like, having six limbs - arms, legs, and wings. 

This style has been especially common since the Middle Ages. European dragons depicted with only two legs are known as wyverns.

Early Mesopotamian mythologies introduce the idea of a hero slaying the dragon, and this is carried on throughout Middle Age literature. 

The image of dragons protecting or hoarding a treasure may have arisen from the practice of introducing snakes to food storage areas to deter mice.

Modern Dragons

Chinese, Japanese, and Korean dragons are most often snake-like, but having four legs and no wings. They are a religious symbol associated with wisdom and longevity.

No matter their origin, most dragon mythologies have in common the scaly, reptilian nature of the creature, as well as its ability to breathe fire - or if not fire, something extraordinary, such as poison or immense amounts of water. 

Crocodiles, spitting cobras, and the fossils of large animals are thought to have inspired these legends.

Modern Dragons

In the modern mythologies of film and animation, a number of feature films and television series have featured dragon characters, often in starring roles.

How to Train Your Dragon (2010), along with its sequels, series, and video games, employs a large cast of dragons, most notably Toothless the Night Fury.

Other dragon films include Pete's Dragon (1977 and 2016), Dragonheart (1996), Shrek (2001), Eragon (2006), and Mulan (1998). Dragon Tales, American Dragon: Jake Long, as well as the various Pokemon, Dragon Ball, and My Little Pony animated series are just a few examples of television cartoons with dragon characters.

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  • I really thought that this would include Tui T. Sutherland 's Wings of Fire dragons. You know, Nightwing, Icewing, Sandwing, Seawing, Mudwing, Rainwing, Hivewing, Leafwing and Silkwing. Could you add those?

  • Hello,

    Thank you for all the great tutorials!

    I just wanted to let you know that the majority of links to the drawinghub are broken; I get a 403 Forbidden message.

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